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7 Things Cat Owners Should Know About Feline Urinary Tract Problems

7-Things-Cat-Owners-Should-Know-About-Feline-Urinary-Tract-Problems
Consider the following scenario: You notice your cat going back and forth to the litter box late at night, long after your vet has closed for the day. He appears to be trying to pee, but there isn't much coming out. He sits down after each trip and begins licking his genitals profusely. If you look in the box to see what's going on, you might notice that what little urine he's passed has a bloody tint to it. Your cat may have feline lower urinary tract disease or FLUTD.
 
Here are some facts about this frustrating syndrome.
 
1. The urinary tract is a four-part system
The kidneys filter toxins out of the blood and produce urine; the ureters, which connect the kidneys to the bladder; the bladder itself, which serves as a reservoir for pee; and the urethra, which connects the bladder to the outside of the body.
 
2. FLUTD symptoms demand an immediate vet visit
If you recall nothing else from this blog, keep this in mind: If your male cat starts acting strangely about weeing, you must get him to us as soon as possible. A urinary tract obstruction can cause the bladder to fill with so much pee that it ruptures. Male cats' urethras are longer and narrower than female cats', making them more prone to urinary tract obstructions. Female cats experiencing FLUTD symptoms, on the other hand, should visit us as soon as possible.
 
3. The condition is extremely painful
You know how much a urinary tract infection hurts if you've ever had one. Cats feel the same amount of pain as humans, and most of their agitation stems from the fact that they're in excruciating discomfort.
 
4. The first diagnostic tool is a urinalysis
A urinalysis is a test that determines whether your cat's urine contains bacteria, viruses, parasites, blood, crystals, or stones. To ensure a sterile sample, we may propose a cystocentesis (a technique in which a needle is inserted into the bladder to pull out urine). An X-ray or ultrasound may also be advised to look for stones, cysts, or polyps in the bladder.
 
5. Many cases of FLUTD don’t have an obvious cause
Although some cases of FLUTD are caused by crystals or stones in the urinary tract, or by bacterial or viral infections, the majority don’t have any obvious cause. In these cases, stress is thought to be a trigger. But even if there’s no obvious disease, stress-caused FLUTD is still very painful and still needs prompt veterinary treatment.
 
6. We may recommend prescription food
If crystals are found in your cat's urine, we will recommend a prescription diet. This diet is designed to modify the urine's acid-alkaline balance and reduce the chance of future crystal development. The sort of food recommended is determined by the crystals discovered in your cat's pee.
 
7. Stress management could help
If your cat has FLUTD that's not caused by a disease we may suggest reducing his stress levels through play, environmental enrichment, or other methods to reduce the chance of recurrences.
 
To our valued clients
Dental disease in cats

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123 Main South Road
O’Halloran Hill, SA 5158

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142 Sir Donald Bradman Drive
Hilton, SA 5033